Wills & Estate Planning Attorneys in Greenville

Trust Us to Help You Plan

At Hayes Law Firm Upstate Attorneys, LLC, our Greenville wills and estate planning attorneys can assist you in your estate planning needs. We prepare simple wills and offer reduced prices on packages, which include powers of attorney and medical/health care directives. Medical directives include medical powers of attorney and Declaration of Desire for Natural Death, which addresses the topic of life support. Our team can explain the nature of the documents you need in your first consultation and obtain the information necessary to draft your documents during that meeting. Documents are usually prepared within days, but can, at times, and for an additional fee, be prepared on shorter notice. Contact us to schedule your estate planning needs and get peace of mind.

Call (864) 432-5353 or fill out our online form to schedule an appointment with our caring and professional team.

What is an Estate Plan?

An estate plan is a written document that contains information on how you want your assets divided upon your death. As it is a legal document recognized by the Court, your family and friends are not allowed to alter it or disobey its directives.

While many people assume they don’t need to create an estate plan until they’re older or approaching death, the reality is that anyone can make an estate plan to secure their future and the future of their families. Our clients range from older individuals in their retirement years to younger generations who have higher wealth accumulations, as well as business owners who wish to protect their legacy for generations to come.

Elements of an Estate Plan

Estate plans contain numerous elements that provide directives in areas including the disbursement of valuables and properties, protection for heirs to inheritances, and establishing an individual to make important decisions in the event that the individual is incapable.

Some of the estate planning services our attorneys offer to clients young and old include:

  • Wills: Your last will and testament should explain in detail how you want your property and assets dispersed when you die. If you have any minor children, dependents, or pets, it should also appoint a designated guardian and specific instructions for their care.
  • Trusts: Trusts are similar to wills, only a trustee is appointed to carry out your plans. While wills go through probate, meaning they must go through court to be executed and put on public record, trusts avoid probate and can be handled in a private manner. A trust can also be enacted before you pass away, so you can be your own trustee while you’re alive.
  • Beneficiary forms: If you wish to designate beneficiaries to your financial accounts, from bank and retirement accounts to life insurance policies, you can file a series of forms. It’s important that you update your forms as circumstances change.
  • Powers of attorney: You can establish powers of attorney to name individuals that act on your behalf when you’re unable due, whether because of injury or illness. You can appoint one person to handle everything, from your bank accounts to health care, or you can designate a power of attorney to handle each area of your life.
  • Living wills: Separate from a last will and testament, a living will outlines what you want for yourself if you are ever incapacitated. This means, for instance, if you were to fall into a coma, your will can dictate whether or not you want to be kept on life support. Sometimes living wills are paired with a health care power of attorney.

Our legal team knows that estate plans are about so much more than the amount of money you have – they contain your wishes for yourself, your family, and your assets, and serve to safeguard your loved ones’ futures. They’re a way for you to have control over your livelihood and your legacy. Our Greenville wills and estate planning attorneys are committed to aiding you in anything you require, from filing paperwork to interpreting legal jargon.

Call (864) 432-5353 to schedule a consultation today. It’s never too early to begin thinking about your emergency plans and how you want your things treated after you pass away.